Jealousy

Posted on Sep 1, 2016 in Self-Help

As IG is flooded with pics of perfectly positioned poses, it seems like everyone and their mother is a superstar yogi. I am not one of those people.

I am someone who likes the feeling of stretching and someone who appreciates reminders of awareness and deep breathing.

I’m also someone who has more or less sat in admiration of yogis for years, but never taken on a consistent practice myself.

Recently though, I’ve made some regular attendance in a flow class and am already tuning into the myriad of lessons that translate from on to off the mat.

??

Especially as social media has us injecting the highlight reels of our peers into the monotonous moments of our daily lives, it’s the unfortunate truth that comparative internal dialogue is commonplace in our culture. “Look at them they are so much more talented, more fit; smarter; better looking; more accomplished; happier; cooler; more confident; more put together; they have more friends than I do…” It seems to be automatic in our society that we size ourselves up against each other, and even to ourselves – comparing our current state to what we perceive was a better version. “I used to be so happy; so successful; so fit; so outgoing; so vibrant; so lean; I used to have everything together.”

?

In the studio however, we learn that there is no space for this chatter. Setting up for a pose, though we may be surrounded by a flock of more seasoned yogis, all perched steady in their crows and their cranes, it does us no benefit to become distracted by our neighbors.

?

Intimidation or ego inflation, it will not serve to make comparisons in either direction. What kind of information are you really gathering when the variables are so vast that there could never be a true assessment anyway?

“Wow, they hold their crane pose for a full minute longer than I can!” Well, they may have a particular anatomical advantage that makes this easier to achieve.

“I’m so much more flexible than them!” Well, they may be coming back from an injury. Or, “I’m so much stronger than they are!” Well, they may actually have 10 years experience, but it’s not evident right now because they’ve already done 3 other classes today and are consequently fatigued.

?

What we learn in the studio is that, like in life, in order to maintain balance, in order to build strength, one cannot become distracted.

If we peek at a neighbor or out the window or get taken by a thought, we’ll surely fall.

IN ORDER TO MAINTAIN BALANCE AND BUILD STRENGTH, the extent of the occupation is… to is focus on the breath, check in with alignment, recall the intention, and relax to deepen.

 

And when there is pain on the path…

Enjoy the challenge of the work.

Listen to the body.

Trust in the wisdom of your being.

 

 Like this post? You may also enjoy Kindness or Non-Attachment.

One Comment

  1. I have a really positive opinion on your ability ro explain the human experience!!!

    Thank you so much for your twist on the everyday hurdles and hiccups so many dont give any attention to or more commonly arent even aware of.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *